Currently Browsing: Visual Scares / Predator Replicas

Facility Bird Control: 5 Key Steps to a Bird-Free Building

1.) Landscape Alterations
Your first line of defense is the facility’s outdoor property – make sure yours isn’t a bird paradise.  Neatly cut grass, large open spaces, peaceful ponds, and easily accessible building surfaces are an open invitation to pest birds from miles around.  Instead, plant trees and bushes generously, and allow grass to grow thick around pond edges.  When birds sense that predators may be hiding nearby, the area will have less bird-appeal.  For extra protection, treat lawns and foliage with a bird taste aversion such as Bird Stop.

2.) Physical Barriers
Next, physically prevent birds from accessing the building.  Install Bird Netting in areas where birds may be tempted to seek shelter – large openings, remote corners, and small sheltered spaces.  Affix Bird Spikes to rooftop ledges, edges, beams, AC units, chimneys, and other surfaces where birds may perch.

3.) Property Maintenance & Sanitation
A little upkeep goes a long way.  Make sure windows are sealed properly and doorways are closed when not in use.  Check regularly for cracks in roofing – pest pigeon droppings and a leaky roof were the alleged source of one of the largest food recalls in FDA history (2007 Peanut Butter Recall).  A clean facility, inside and out, is much less likely to attract pests of all kinds.  Follow strict waste management guidelines and make sure your drainage system is efficient and working properly.  Blocked drains, stagnant water and overflowing trash bins are dream come true for bacteria, mold, insects, rodents, pest birds and other pest animals.

4.) Overload the Senses
Birds survive primarily on their audio-visual senses.  That, and good instincts.  When attempting to keep pest birds away from a large property, make the whole area seem uninhabitable by using their natural fear of predators against them.  Visual scares and predator decoys can be easily installed on lawns, in trees, in ponds and near doorways to repel pest birds.  Audio deterrents are a great way to reach pest birds across several acres, warning them to STAY AWAY.  Sonic devices use bird distress calls and predator cries to alert pest birds within range that the area is not safe, while ultrasonic repellers use high-frequency (silent-to-humans) sound waves that irritate and disorient birds nearby.

5.) Synergize
For the highest probability of success, use all of these tactics together.  Get on the fast-track to a bird-free facility by making your property less physically hospitable to pest birds WHILE simultaneously unleashing a multi-sensory attack on incoming birds.

Crazy pigeons

Pigeons are so annoying!

I remember the times when it used to be like “Hey, there’s a pigeon in the way so let me just lightly step in its direction and it’ll fly away,” and that was all there was to it. However it’s a completely different story now. They’ve obviously mastered the art of adapting to urban environments.

Now they flock together and glare at you mockingly, daring you to step in “their” territory.  When I need to pass, I try to get them out of the way by idiotically stomping like a madwoman and chasing them, which in so many ways never works to my advantage.

After a while their all-too-comfortable presence gets frustrating. I mean, seriously, can you deal with the constant cooing that resonates in your ear, forcing you to scrunch your face in disgust?  How about their piercing red eyes, mucky feathers, razor-sharp beaks, and prickly clawed feet? Or how about the thought of them proudly mingling and feasting within five centimeters of your standing area without acknowledging your presence?

I’m a frequent public transportation rider, which unfortunately means that I’m always forced to share my limited waiting space with random flocks of disease-ridden pigeons.  Sometimes I wonder how so many birds can manage to remain in the same area for such a long period of time.  Oh, wait, I forget that oblivious culprits feed them falling to acknowledge the potential environmental and health risks that come along with doing such a thing.

When I witness these “culprits” feeding them, I always think to myself, “What the heck are you doing?! Do you not see that huge sign with huge letters telling you NOT to feed the birds? I think the sign’s there for a reason!”

I’ll have you know that birds are actually smarter than you think. They are completely capable of adapting to different settings. They just choose not to due to lack of incentive. I respect them as animals and all, but they need not roam about in metropolitan areas. If we continue to feed them nonchalantly, they will never get accustomed to natural wildlife environments.

People generally hesitate to approach unpleasant settings. Luckily I know how to effectively rid birds from any given area. (But sadly I’m no property owner. All I can do is spread the word.) I work for Bird-X, which is a company that specifically focuses on humanely getting rid of pesky birds and other critters. It’s important that solutions are logical and humane because illogical and inhumane fixes are cruel, redundant, and most importantly ineffective. I would love it if local officials considered administering effective maintenance strategies. Heck, I’d love it even more if private property owners did the same. It’s as simple as setting up a few Terror-Eyes, BroadBand PROs, and Spikes. That way pigeons become uncomfortable with the environment and we city dwellers can avoid crazy bird harassment.

Poisoning pigeons in the park

Several years ago, while driving home from the city, my friends and I were looking for some good music to play in the car to “rock out” to and blast from the windows on our way home. This was in the day before mp3s, iPods, satellite radio and CDs. My tape deck had conked out and I was forced to resort to the basic ad-filled radio. As we scanned through the stations (going absolutely nuts mind you because there seemed to be only ballads by Fleetwood Mac on at 12:30 at night), we hit upon a station playing a really hilarious song. We only caught the end of it, but the last stanza went like this:

“…with each drop of strychnine / We feed to a pigeon. / It just takes a smidgen! / To poison a pigeon in the park…”

We quickly called up the station, a popular classic rock station here in Chicago, and after a few tries, finally got through. The show was syndicated but we didn’t care. We had to know the song. The producer said he would play it in its entirety after the show ended, which he did – at 2:00 am. The song was called “Poisoning Pigeons in the Park” and is about a couple of people who go out every spring Sunday afternoon and poison pigeons in the park (and sometimes a squirrel).

As I look back on those times with my friends and all the fun we had – the one thing that keeps popping in my mind is that song (and the frantic search for it. Though, the funny thing about that song is that – several years later – I now work for a company that manufactures products the use humane methods for getting rid of pigeons in parks (and other places).

And while the song may ring true for many an angry park goer, that happens to be the WORST way to get rid of pigeons. The only tried and true way to get rid of pigeons for good is through behavior modification. The pigeons won’t leave an area unless they think it is unsavory. Meaning that it isn’t safe, secure or there’s no food.

One great way to get rid of pesky pigeons, especially if you have a serious pest bird problem or pigeon problem is to use a sound device. Anyone can blast a radio, but as we all know, pigeons adapt to their enviroments pretty fast. When walking the streets of Chicago, I see pigeons walking down the middle of busy streets and on the “L” (elevated) train tracks and fly away at the last minute only to return a moment or two later. You should really try a sound device such as a BroadBand PRO or a BirdXPeller PRO. These products use natural bird sounds – in this case pigeon alert and alarm calls – to scare away the birds. Other sounds found on these devices are that of predators of pigeons (hawks, eagles, owls, etc) that will make the area undesirable because it means that their is potential danger nearby.

One could also try using a spray solution like our BirdShield product. This is mixed with water and sprayed on vegetation, trees, buildings, can be added to ponds and most of all, it is non-harmful and non-toxic. It just tastes really, really bitter. Once sprayed on the pigeons’ food source and they’ll stop eating it and go look for food elsewhere.

Or you can start with a visual scare device like a Prowler Owl or a Terror Eyes scare balloon. These products look like the predators that scare off little pigeons and with one look at these “terrifying” objects, the pigeons scram.

As one can imagine, one doesn’t necessarily have to poison pigeons to get them to leave the park. In fact, poisoning them doesn’t tell the other pigeons that the area is unsavory – so all you’re really doing is replacing the foul birds with more foul (fowl?) birds. Take it from us, we know what we’re talking about. We’ve been moving birds from corporate, residential, municipal, and practically every other area you can think of for over 45 years. Visit us at www.bird-x.com and find out how you can solve your pigeon or other bird pest problem today!

Those pesky critters are invading my property?!

AND WHAT YOU CAN DO TO PREVENT THEM!

There are so many great things about a garden. Not only is a garden a way to relieve stress, but they make your property prettier, which drives up property value, you can grow fruits and vegetables for sustenance and it adds value your neighbor’s property which makes the whole neighborhood more valuable.

But, when you add pesky animals to the mix, you can pretty much say goodbye to anything mentioned above, plus your property will look worse due to the destruction these animals bring. Not too mention that your stress level has gone up and your fruits and vegetables have been consumed by other creatures – a garden can truly be a hassle…

Though, with a few bits of information and some “how-to’s” we know that we can help make your garden pest-free. First, take a look at the BIRD-X ANIMAL PEST REPELLENT page and familiarize yourself with our products. Then, let’s get to know our garden variety pests:

Armadillo

Armadillo


Armadillo:
An armadillo is an expert digger. They can cause serious damage to a lawn or a nicely landscaped area. They often dig holes in undesirable places such as underneath a concrete porch, the foundation of a house or near water/gas lines. If they remove too much dirt from under a concrete foundation, the foundation faces the danger of cracking and crumbling – you could easily kiss your house goodbye. Their burrows may also attract other animals such as the opossum (see below). If you see a large hole in your lawn or property with a lot of dirt thrown around it, then you have an armadillo.

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

Chipmunks: Don’t be fooled, chipmunks are rodents and are best described as small ground dwelling squirrels. While these little guys may be a favorite of children everywhere, they are not so much in favor with gardeners. Chipmunks are omnivores. Their primary diet consists of grains, nuts, berries, seeds and insects. They are also burrowing animals. They also like to eat flower bulbs, fruits, and seedlings – all conveniently found in your garden. If they are around in large numbers they can cause structural damage by burrowing under patios, stairs, retention walls or foundations.

Deer

Deer

Deer: We all loved Bambi and hated to see her mother get killed in the famous story, but this is real life and while we would prefer not to shoot the deer roaming through our neighborhood, darting across the street and eating all our plants – we must find a way to stop them…humanely. The primary concern with deer is their appetite. They will eat a large array of plants and vegetation. They will eat your crops, damage your trees and can ruin your nice landscaping. Deer are also responsible for the spread of Lyme Disease because they are carriers of Deer Ticks.

Fox

Fox


Fox:
The fox is a medium sized canine with a large bushy tail, often tipped in white. The fox ranges in color from flame red to rust red to a grayish color, but is usually reddish-brown. The fox uses a variety of different habitats for dens including abandoned holes dug by other animals. Their diet varies and often includes small animals and birds. These guys a mostly a hazard for poultry producers. Turkeys, chickens, ducks, and geese are all susceptible to an opportunistic fox. Young pigs, lamb and small pets are also considered tasty morsels. They will also steal food left for outdoor pets. Foxes may carry rabies.

Mole

Mole


Mole:
Moles live underground and occasionally come to the surface. Their cylindrical bodies and powerful front claws are ideal for digging. Moles create a complex labyrinth of interconnected chambers by burrowing both deep and close to the surface. Though your primary concern is the tunnels. They can leave ridged tunnels all over a lawn. While they are not necessarily harmful, they can ruin your nice landscaping and leave holes all over the place. Though, if you see a large hole with dirt all around, it probably is an armadillo, but a smaller hole might mean a mole.

Opossum

Opossum


Opossum:
Opossums are unique for several reasons: They are the only North American marsupials (meaning that females have a pouch on the belly where the young – up to 13 – are carried and nourished), they have a prehensile tail from which they can hang, and are also known for “playing dead” as a defense tactic. The main issues with an opossum are that they are known to find shelter underneath a porch or a shed. They steal garbage, pet food and harass pets. They will build a home in your attic and have their babies there. They will invade a home under the floorboards and in the walls. And if they die in your home they will cause a horrible odor (like anything else that dies in your home). The main problem with opossum in your attic, walls, basement, etc is that they leave a large amount of droppings which can carry several different parasites and diseases. They are not the cleanest of animals, and carry a strong odor that is unbearable.

Rabbit

Rabbit


Rabbits:
The Cottontail Rabbit is not part of the rodent family. It is classified in Lagomorphs. Litter sizes up to 10 have been reported, but typical litters have 3 to 5 young, born after a gestation period of about 28 days. Eastern Cottontails are herbivorous, eating a wide variety of plant materials. They are cute to look at, both adults and children marvel at and are infatuated with them. While they may be part of some religious holidays, they also a known for creating a large amount of crop damage. In high numbers, they can decimate your garden. They will eat all the plants, flowers, flower bulbs and vegetables that you grow in your garden. Additionally, rabbits can infect humans through openings in the skin with Tularemia, a bacterial disease, which is also known as rabbit fever or deer-fly fever.

Raccoon

Raccoon


Raccoons:
Raccoons are easy to recognize with their distinctive black mask and ringed tail. They are common in practically every neighborhood in every city and are well adapted to survival in cities. They are known as excellent climbers and have very nimble hands, are strong and are adventurous – with no problem tearing open new areas in search of food and shelter. They like to den in trees, but also find attics as a great alternative. They have learned that garbage cans and dumpsters are excellent sources of food and that houses are an excellent habitat. A mother raccoon will tear a hole in a roof to access an attic where they will make quite a mess and a lot of noise. They can cause quite a substantial amount of damage to your home by both contaminations from their waste or by structural damage to insulation, beams or even by chewing on wires. They will even break into a screened porch in search of food. If there’s food or shelter to be had, raccoons will break into your house, crawl under your house and climb through the walls. They carry a large number of parasites and diseases that can affect people and pets alike. They are the #1 carrier for rabies, a potentially fatal disease and they also carry canine distemper which can kill your dog. Their feces may contain raccoon roundworm, the spores of which can infect humans when breathed in.

Skunk

Skunk


Skunks:
Skunks are easy to recognize with their bold black and white coloring. Using special glands below the tail, skunks can spray their powerful scent up to 15 feet. The scent burns the attacker’s eyes and causes temporary blindness. Of course, the stench is too much for most animals to bear, and serves as a strong warning against future attacks. Most skunk problems involve skunks that have chosen to take up residence under your house or in a crawlspace, under a porch, deck or shed. They often dig to gain access to these are. No homeowner appreciates this scent under their deck. And, a skunk in the area poses a constant threat to nosey pets that are not aware of a skunk’s defense mechanism. Skunks are omnivorous animals that eat both plants and animals and will change their diet as the seasons change. They will topple garbage to gain access to food and will often eat pet food or the carcasses of rodents left behind by cats.

Squirrel

Squirrel


Squirrels:
Squirrels are members of the rodent family and are very active year-round. A mother squirrel bears young twice a year, usually in February and August. They are arboreal, which means they live in trees, but they also seem to love attics. They are active most in the mornings and evenings and eat all kinds of food, but prefer nuts and seeds. They especially like the seed found in your bird feeder and their amazing acrobatic moves allow them to reach almost anywhere they want to go. To gain access to your attic or soffit, they will chew a hole in your house, often times near wires for phone, electricity or cable/satellite television entering your home. The attic provides shelter and warmth which is ideal for baby squirrels but not ideal for a homeowner who has to contend with chewed wood, beams and power lines which can create a fire hazard. They also bring nesting material and biohazardous waste into an attic.

Bird-X, Inc.

Bird-X, Inc.

Bird-X, Inc: The bird and critter control experts since 1964 is the only company that promotes humane, non-toxic, non-lethal, environmentally-safe and ecologically sound pest control. Whether you have an issue with one of the critters listed above, a bird or a bat problem, Bird-X has the solution. Our vast selection of roost inhibitors, ultrasonic/sonic electronic devices, laser and other visual scare tactics, or taste aversion products for any situation or budget. Visit us online at www.bird-x.com or call us today at 800.662.5021 to find the solution to your problem.